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Upcoming Programs: Complete List

September 11, 2017 to September 14, 2017

  • Designed for grades K–3 teachers.

    Elementary teachers use a variety of literacy assessments (mClass, STAR, benchmarks, unit tests, spelling inventories, etc.) in order to get a complete picture of their students’ literacy ability. These assessments generate a lot of data that can be overwhelming. Investigate how to get the most out of the literacy data by linking assessment data to literacy instruction. Explore ways to manage the data for each student. Discover ways to use literacy data to plan for individual, small, and whole group instruction while examining strategies to differentiate instruction to meet the learning needs of all students.

  • Designed for ELA teachers of grades 6–8 and those who coach them.

    Middle grades ELA inhabits a type of educational limbo. Intellectually, students are capable of taking on complex reading and writing tasks but many are still developing the necessary maturity to do so. This program will examine the knowledge and skills necessary to transition successfully from elementary to high school. Teachers will engage in and then craft their own language arts activities that engage both the child and the budding adult in each of their students. Activities will address reading, writing, thinking, speaking and listening skills.

  • It’s time to start thinking outside the box! Teachers often think projects take too much time to plan or don’t know how to align them with curriculum. Project Based Learning units (PBLs) are an effective and enjoyable way to learn that allow students to work as a team, reflect, ask questions, build confidence, work with a purpose, problem solve, and learn time management. Investigate what essential questions, unit questions, and content questions will enable you to develop your own PBL unit. Return to your classroom with a PBL unit you create that will excite and engage your students as they claim ownership of their learning.

September 18, 2017 to September 21, 2017

  • Today’s diverse students enter school eager to become successful in classrooms originally designed for culturally homogeneous populations and are expected to learn from teachers who are often not from the same cultural, ethnic/race or social-class. Unsurprisingly, student performance in reading and other subjects is often low while student dropout and teacher burnout rates are high. This program guides participants to explore and document their experiences in motivating at-risk students to become effective readers. In addition to sharing successful strategies for improving reading skills and producing a written narrative, participants will examine barriers children encounter along the pathway and how these barriers affected them. Additionally, participants will become familiar with strategies they can use today to change the culture of the classroom to support the development of higher order thinking skills while enhancing self-motivation, personal responsibility, and perseverance to become skilled readers who excel academically.

September 19, 2017 to September 22, 2017

  • Designed for teachers of grades 58.

    Which of our state’s national parks is home to over 12,000 documented species of plants, animals and invertebrates? In which park can you walk in the footsteps of Revolutionary War patriots? North Carolina is home to ten national park units stretching from the Great Smoky Mountains to the Cape Hatteras shores. These parks offer diverse opportunities to spark students’ desire to learn more about the rich science and history of our state. Discover how park resources, including informational texts and supplemental materials, can also enhance literacy skills. Learn ways your students can experience our parks both physically and virtually. Partner with national park rangers, historians and science experts to create lessons that will engage student learning in your classroom.

September 25, 2017 to September 28, 2017

  • With students learning in 1:1 environments, there is a push for integrating more technology into the classroom. However, technology is changing constantly. So how does one keep up? How does one teach their students to become responsible digital citizens? Come learn why it is important to address the responsible use of technology with your students as they learn to connect, collaborate, and communicate effectively, and safely. Explore resources, articles, and lessons that promote digital citizenship in the classroom. Learn how to weave digital citizenship into your curriculum and create lessons that allow students to become more social media savvy.

October 2, 2017 to October 5, 2017

  • Designed for high school ELA teachers and those who coach them.

    A false dilemma offered by critics of standardized testing is that they force teachers to focus on low-level skills if their students are to perform well on end-of-course exams. This is simply untrue. The NC English II End of Course tests (EOC) require that students analyze written text in the service of extracting meaning, recognizing the effect of particular words, and identifying an author’s stance on an issue, among other valuable skills. In this program, teachers will consider the “big picture” issues that English II should address. They also will engage in a variety of activities intended to enhance students’ reading, writing, and thinking skills.

  • Writing instruction is not only important but also vital for today’s students. Yet finding the time to teach writing in the elementary classroom can prove challenging. In this program, teachers will explore the various purposes for writing, the writing process, and strategies to integrate writing in other content areas. Additionally, teachers will investigate creative strategies to motivate students to write.

October 9, 2017 to October 12, 2017

  • Designed for grades K–6 teachers.

    Wondering how to engage your students as they explore and develop math understanding and mastery? You can make math meaningful for your students. Come and refresh your understanding of Howard Gardner’s Theory of Multiple Intelligences (MI) as you engage in activities designed to help connect the ways your students are “smart” to the NC Math Standards. Explore and develop learning strategies to support math mastery as we look at planning for and assessing math standards for your grade level. With ideas for the self-smart and the people-smart, the naturalist, musical, verbal, kinesthetic and visual learners, you’ll leave ready to start your year the MI way! This program is presented by A+ Schools of North Carolina. 

  • Designed for teachers in grades 4 to 12.

    The statistics are consistent: young male readers lag behind their female counterparts in literacy skills. In many instances, the reading scores of boys bring down the reading scores for the entire school. Explore the social, psychological, and developmental reasons why boys lag behind girls. Identify reading materials you can use in your classroom to capture and keep the attention of your struggling readers. Experience a variety of instructional methods such as text selection designed for boys, contests and competitions, focus reading groups, and the latest websites and blogs to boost literacy achievement. Discover solutions to capture the attention of reluctant male readers and examine strategies that motivate boys to sustain reading in the classroom and at home.

October 16, 2017 to October 19, 2017

  • Canvas, North Carolina’s Learning Management System (LMS), is your place for one-stop learning and course management. Teachers will become familiar with the features of Canvas such as the settings, notifications, and tools in building a course. Create modules using a variety of items such as discussions, assignments, quizzes, and content pages. Set up generic or tailored rubrics for use with a variety of content. This program is designed for beginning users and will allow time to experiment, collaborate, and build at your own pace. Teachers will have a module or more ready to implement on returning to the classroom.

October 17, 2017 to October 20, 2017

  • Designed for teachers of grades 48.

    The North Carolina General Assembly mandates that public schools identify and serve gifted children, and each LEA is required to have an AIG plan. Join teachers of AIG students and experts in the field of science as we investigate strategies to motive the critical thinking skills of gifted children. Create lessons that enrich, extend, and accelerate AIG science standards. Explore the policies and best practices of AIG expectations, create ways to challenge gifted children, and encourage continual intellectual growth.

October 23, 2017 to October 26, 2017

  • Digital learning is a broad category that encompasses the use of digital resources and technology to enhance and differentiate instruction. The number of available options, however, can be overwhelming. Gain experience with free high-quality tools for: video and audio production, blended lessons, games in education, online content, augmented reality, and digital formative assessment. Dive into robotics and discover how inexpensive classroom robots can be used across grades and subjects to teach higher-order thinking and problem solving. Participants will learn how to make their own rudimentary robots! Those who attend this session will explore these digital tools as students, determine how to use them effectively as teachers, and leave NCCAT with a virtual toolbox of techniques to take back to the classroom

  • Designed for teachers of grades K8.

    Today’s students use phones, tablets, computers, and video games as ways to obtain information. Information does not always link to understanding! What types of strategies can teachers use to include this type of information sourcing? Are literacy strategies the same for traditional text as they are for digital text? Discuss the digital divide and the complexities involved with nontraditional text. Investigate strategies for “digging deeper” into digital text. Explore a variety of digital tools you can use to make literacy instruction and learning more authentic and relevant.

  • Designed for high school ELA teachers and those who coach them.

    Many freshmen struggle academically, not because they lack ability but because they are not prepared to exercise the personal responsibility their teachers expect of them. Successful teachers of English I find ways to bridge the gap, to support the recent middle schooler without alienating the high schooler. This program will examine the knowledge and skills necessary to make that transition. Teachers will engage in and then craft their own language arts activities that support and extend their students’ abilities. Activities will address reading, writing, thinking, speaking and listening skills.

October 30, 2017 to November 2, 2017

  • The multiple transitions that North Carolina has made in the mathematics curriculum have students, teachers, administrators, and parents scratching their heads. How can we navigate the complexities of a very difficult subject in a world where numerical fluency is increasingly important? Many high school students have given up. They are turning to Wolfram-Alpha or deciding that “I’m not a math person.” Explore ways to engage students in the secondary mathematics classroom to show the relevance and importance of math in their everyday lives. Discover interactive digital resources to use in the classroom and connect with other educators across the state to form supportive networks.

  • Whether or not your school or district has adopted a Google Chromebook environment, if your LEA infrastructure allows for the use of Google Tools and/or Apps, the “Googlesphere” can be an immense help. It can aid in engaging students, keeping in touch with parents, automating feedback and assessment, sharing documents, and more. Hone your skills with the Google Chrome Browser, with Google Apps, with Android Apps, and with Chrome OS so that you can engage your students using freely available tools on almost any platform.

November 6, 2017 to November 9, 2017

  • Designed for teachers in grades 3–12.

    Students are engaged when they are involved in their work, persist despite challenges and obstacles, and take visible delight in their accomplishments. Solving student engagement issues is complex. What works in one class may be a failure in the next, with every year presenting new challenges for engaging students in various lessons. This program will review and evaluate strategies for motivating disengaged students and will prepare you to implement them upon your return to the classroom.

November 8, 2017 to November 12, 2017

  • Designed for educators teaching students in 6th through 12th grade.

    200-word essay required for placement (see below for details)

    The aim of this program is to gain an understanding of the precursors, events, and consequences of the Holocaust and to grapple with the problem of how best to convey this history and the meaning that it can have in the lives and civic practices of our students. To accomplish this goal, we will explore the exhibits and other resources of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, DC. Participants will meet our bus at predetermined locations across the state and then journey together to Washington for this intensive week. Under the guidance of museum staff and teacher fellows, we will study in the museum which has earned an international reputation for the quality of its contents, presentations, architecture, and technology. This program is for educators involved or interested in teaching about the Holocaust to students eleven years of age and older. (Two participants to a room. Participants must be physically able to walk up to 1/2 mile over level ground, stand for extended periods, and ride for up to 8 hours on an excursion bus without detriment to their health.)

    Three days of substitute teacher costs are covered. Applicants must exhibit a seriousness of interest in the subject matter as expressed in an essay that is reviewed by NCCAT staff as a part of the application process.

November 13, 2017 to November 16, 2017

  • Designed for elementary math, ELA, or self-contained teachers of grades 3–5.

    Students who struggle with the abstract and symbolic nature of mathematics may benefit from leveraging their reading and writing skills to analyze, evaluate, and solve complex problems. In this program, teachers will engage in a series of activities that combine reading and writing skills with mathematical inquiry. They will then have time to create or revise lessons that integrate these areas. Teachers of younger or older students may benefit, but activities will be geared to the upper elementary grades.

  • Literacy instruction is as difficult as it is essential. This program will provide early grades teachers with a complement of research-based tools and strategies to help answer some of their more burning questions: How do I teach close reading to students who don’t yet know the alphabet? What level of writing can I attain from children who are still learning to spell? How do I simultaneously provide enrichment for advanced readers and remediation for delayed readers? How can I integrate reading and writing instruction into all other subject areas? Finally, what does this instruction look like in the classroom and how are student engagement and learning measured in this process?

November 27, 2017 to November 30, 2017

  • Reading, as the old saying goes, is fundamental. However, not all public school students have access to the variety of materials necessary to build a strong reading foundation. Research grant opportunities for purchasing books, digital devices, and other materials to aid in literacy instruction. Explore multiple means of acquiring literacy-related donations and discover open-access materials online. Finally, participate in the sharing of strategies for the effective use of these resources.

  • Writing well allows students to process and organize their thoughts and feelings and to communicate effectively with a range of audiences. Writing well is also one of the most difficult skills to teach, and many find the task overwhelming. The grading alone taxes the commitment of even the best of our profession. In this program, we will examine ways to write and how best to introduce various writing techniques to your students while providing useful, timely feedback. Participants will be given several writing assignments and should be prepared to give and receive feedback on that writing.

December 4, 2017 to December 7, 2017

  • Whether or not your school or district has adopted a Google Chromebook environment, if your LEA infrastructure allows for the use of Google Tools and/or Apps, the “Googlesphere” can be an immense help. It can aid in engaging students, keeping in touch with parents, automating feedback and assessment, sharing documents, and more. Hone your skills with the Google Chrome Browser, with Google Apps, with Android Apps, and with Chrome OS so that you can engage your students using freely available tools on almost any platform.

December 11, 2017 to December 14, 2017

  • What should literacy instruction look like in today’s classrooms? High quality literacy instruction promotes and advances critical thinking. This program will investigate intentional instruction that fosters critical thinking skills. Examine strategies to “dig deeper” into the text and discover the art of dialogue and purposeful questions. Utilize multiple media and technologies to support and enhance a student’s critical eye for thoughtful interpretation of ideas.

December 18, 2017 to December 21, 2017

  • Today’s diverse students enter school eager to become successful in classrooms originally designed for culturally homogeneous populations and are expected to learn from teachers who are often not from the same cultural, ethnic/race or social-class. Unsurprisingly, student performance in reading and other subjects is often low while student dropout and teacher burnout rates are high. This program guides participants to explore and document their experiences in motivating at-risk students to become effective readers. In addition to sharing successful strategies for improving reading skills and producing a written narrative, participants will examine barriers children encounter along the pathway and how these barriers affected them. Additionally, participants will become familiar with strategies they can use today to change the culture of the classroom to support the development of higher order thinking skills while enhancing self-motivation, personal responsibility, and perseverance to become skilled readers who excel academically.

January 8, 2018 to January 12, 2018

  • Open to teachers in their first, second, or third year of teaching, this program supports motivated beginning teachers by strengthening their knowledge base and classroom expertise. Through experiential learning, teachers will explore pedagogical concerns including differentiated instruction, brain-compatible teaching, assessment, the effect of poverty on achievement and behavior, and classroom management. Come prepared to build professional competence and confidence, improve student achievement, and reinforce your commitment to this critically important profession.

January 16, 2018 to January 19, 2018

  • As a teacher, what are your strengths, in and out of the classroom? What are your leadership skills, in and out of the classroom? Standard 1 of The North Carolina Professional Teaching Standards requires that teachers demonstrate leadership that extends beyond their own students. If ambitious, creative, effective teachers could remain in the classroom while still finding means to have impacts on their schools, districts, or communities, the entire educational system would benefit. Teacher leaders will examine their work settings and their roles in them. Teachers will develop means to integrate intellectual growth and leadership skills, as well as explore ways to have continued impacts, in and out of the classroom. They also will step out of their comfort zones for a day of engaging with the US Coast Guard to examine their teamwork and leadership models and hear from leaders in other professions.

January 23, 2018 to January 26, 2018

  • Designed for teachers in grades 4 to 12.

    The statistics are consistent: young male readers lag behind their female counterparts in literacy skills. In many instances, the reading scores of boys bring down the reading scores for the entire school. Explore the social, psychological, and developmental reasons why boys lag behind girls. Identify reading materials you can use in your classroom to capture and keep the attention of your struggling readers. Experience a variety of instructional methods such as text selection designed for boys, contests and competitions, focus reading groups, and the latest websites and blogs to boost literacy achievement. Discover solutions to capture the attention of reluctant male readers and examine strategies that motivate boys to sustain reading in the classroom and at home.

January 29, 2018 to February 1, 2018

  • Research indicates literacy coaches have a direct impact on literacy instruction and student achievement in today’s schools. Coaches use their role in the schools to enhance others’ abilities through motivation and support. This can oftentimes be an overwhelming and daunting task. This program will offer inspiration, guidance, training, modeling of strategies, and evidence based practices for the 21st century elementary literacy coach.

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