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Upcoming Programs: Complete List

December 4, 2017 to December 7, 2017

  • Whether or not your school or district has adopted a Google Chromebook environment, if your LEA infrastructure allows for the use of Google Tools and/or Apps, the “Googlesphere” can be an immense help. It can aid in engaging students, keeping in touch with parents, automating feedback and assessment, sharing documents, and more. Hone your skills with the Google Chrome Browser, with Google Apps, with Android Apps, and with Chrome OS so that you can engage your students using freely available tools on almost any platform.

December 11, 2017 to December 14, 2017

  • What should literacy instruction look like in today’s classrooms? High quality literacy instruction promotes and advances critical thinking. This program will investigate intentional instruction that fosters critical thinking skills. Examine strategies to “dig deeper” into the text and discover the art of dialogue and purposeful questions. Utilize multiple media and technologies to support and enhance a student’s critical eye for thoughtful interpretation of ideas.

December 18, 2017 to December 21, 2017

  • Today’s diverse students enter school eager to become successful in classrooms originally designed for culturally homogeneous populations and are expected to learn from teachers who are often not from the same cultural, ethnic/race or social-class. Unsurprisingly, student performance in reading and other subjects is often low while student dropout and teacher burnout rates are high. This program guides participants to explore and document their experiences in motivating at-risk students to become effective readers. In addition to sharing successful strategies for improving reading skills and producing a written narrative, participants will examine barriers children encounter along the pathway and how these barriers affected them. Additionally, participants will become familiar with strategies they can use today to change the culture of the classroom to support the development of higher order thinking skills while enhancing self-motivation, personal responsibility, and perseverance to become skilled readers who excel academically.

January 8, 2018 to January 12, 2018

  • Open to teachers in their first, second, or third year of teaching, this program supports motivated beginning teachers by strengthening their knowledge base and classroom expertise. Through experiential learning, teachers will explore pedagogical concerns including differentiated instruction, brain-compatible teaching, assessment, the effect of poverty on achievement and behavior, and classroom management. Come prepared to build professional competence and confidence, improve student achievement, and reinforce your commitment to this critically important profession.

January 16, 2018 to January 19, 2018

  • As a teacher, what are your strengths, in and out of the classroom? What are your leadership skills, in and out of the classroom? Standard 1 of The North Carolina Professional Teaching Standards requires that teachers demonstrate leadership that extends beyond their own students. If ambitious, creative, effective teachers could remain in the classroom while still finding means to have impacts on their schools, districts, or communities, the entire educational system would benefit. Teacher leaders will examine their work settings and their roles in them. Teachers will develop means to integrate intellectual growth and leadership skills, as well as explore ways to have continued impacts, in and out of the classroom. They also will step out of their comfort zones for a day of engaging with the US Coast Guard to examine their teamwork and leadership models and hear from leaders in other professions.

January 23, 2018 to January 26, 2018

  • Designed for teachers in grades 4 to 12.

    The statistics are consistent: young male readers lag behind their female counterparts in literacy skills. In many instances, the reading scores of boys bring down the reading scores for the entire school. Explore the social, psychological, and developmental reasons why boys lag behind girls. Identify reading materials you can use in your classroom to capture and keep the attention of your struggling readers. Experience a variety of instructional methods such as text selection designed for boys, contests and competitions, focus reading groups, and the latest websites and blogs to boost literacy achievement. Discover solutions to capture the attention of reluctant male readers and examine strategies that motivate boys to sustain reading in the classroom and at home.

January 29, 2018 to February 1, 2018

  • Research indicates literacy coaches have a direct impact on literacy instruction and student achievement in today’s schools. Coaches use their role in the schools to enhance others’ abilities through motivation and support. This can oftentimes be an overwhelming and daunting task. This program will offer inspiration, guidance, training, modeling of strategies, and evidence based practices for the 21st century elementary literacy coach.

February 5, 2018 to February 8, 2018

  • Designed for teachers in grades 312.

    The world of STEM–science, technology, engineering, and math–provides a rich environment that motivates children to want to learn more. Children often prefer reading about spiders and dinosaurs to fictional characters. STEM activities help students build vocabulary, incorporate problem-solving skills, and analyze complex text with real-world applications. Maximize classroom time by integrating literacy with the natural connections of STEM disciplines. Experience lessons that give students a desire to read, promote problem solving, and model strategies to cultivate reading comprehension. Join us as we make messes, break things, and create minds-on STEM learning environments.

February 5, 2018 to February 9, 2018

  • Foundations of Mathematics equips classroom teachers with the foundational knowledge needed to provide all students with appropriate mathematics instruction. The method uses evidence-based instructional strategies, assessments to guide instruction, appropriate selection of direct instruction programs, and progress monitoring of students. This program helps teachers understand how to make strong mathematical connections to explain the procedures used in mathematics. It will ensure you are able to help your students demystify and conceptualize mathematics. Your students will find a new love of mathematics when you allow them to reason about the math rather than just “do” the math.

February 6, 2018 to February 9, 2018

  • Designed for teachers in grades 4–12.

    Students are engaged when they are involved in their work, persist despite challenges and obstacles, and take visible delight in their accomplishments. Solving student engagement issues is complex. What works in one class may be a failure in the next, with every year presenting new challenges for engaging students in various lessons. This program will use a collaborative classroom process to address questions with how to create a classroom culture and how to create classroom instruction that facilitates self-motivation, personal responsibility, and perseverance. Participants also will review and evaluate motivational strategies for engaging students.

February 12, 2018 to February 15, 2018

  • During the middle grade years, students transition from concrete to abstract understandings. Developing understanding, not simply rote memorization of concepts, is imperative in these grades. Learn how to create contexts for math concepts that lead students to deep understandings of the why and how of middle grades standards. We will use the new NC Standards, which will be implemented in 2018–2019. Explore the multiple avenues you can use to create lessons that require students to persevere in problem-solving while culminating understanding throughout the lesson progression. Learn creative ways to manage your math class so re-teaching can take place for individualized instruction, and formative assessment can happen routinely. Develop a differentiated math classroom that engages students of all skill levels in lessons and activities that create meaning and application.

  • It’s time to start thinking outside the box! Teachers often think projects take too much time to plan or don’t know how to align them with curriculum. Project Based Learning Units (PBLs) are an effective and enjoyable way to learn that allow students to work as a team, reflect, ask questions, build confidence, work with a purpose, problem solve, and learn time management. Investigate essential questions, unit questions, and content questions that will enable you to develop your own PBL unit. Return to your classroom with a PBL unit you create that will excite and engage your students as they claim ownership of their learning.

  • Designed for teachers in grades K3.

    Discover new ways to turn reading strategies into writing opportunities that deepen comprehension and extend student learning. This intensive, interactive program will focus on the power of the teacher as the mentor-model in exploring multiple tools for unlocking thinking in the classroom—through the process of uncovering your own writing life. Strategies will include the use of journal responses, writing as inquiry across the content areas, and the power of authentic interactions with poetry and prompts.

February 19, 2018 to February 22, 2018

  • Designed for elementary math, ELA, or self-contained teachers of grades 3–5.

    Students who struggle with the abstract and symbolic nature of mathematics may benefit from leveraging their reading and writing skills to analyze, evaluate, and solve complex problems. In this program, teachers will engage in a series of activities that combine reading and writing skills with mathematical inquiry. They will then have time to create or revise lessons that integrate these areas. Teachers of younger or older students may benefit, but activities will be geared to the upper elementary grades.

  • The study of STEM—science, technology, engineering, and math—stimulates children to think critically and problem solve. STEM skills are crucial to building workforce readiness. Purposeful integration of tools found in the workplace can make STEM learning more authentic and relevant. Explore various types of technology and tools that can be incorporated into these existing lessons to make them even better. Maximize classroom time by integrating technologies that can make data collection and analysis easier. Experience lessons that give students a desire to ask questions and engineer solutions. Various technologies will be explored including Vernier sensors, coding software, design software, 3D printers, web 2.0 resources, mechatronics and more. Join us as we make messes, break things, fix things and create minds-on STEM learning environments.

February 19, 2018 to February 23, 2018

  • Designed for teachers of grades K5.

    Good readers ask questions before, during, and after reading to make sense of text. Questions provide the opportunity to interact with the text and figure out the deeper meaning of what is being read. How do teachers model good questioning strategies? How do teachers pose questions that foster critical thinking? What types of questions help readers understand confusing parts of a book? Learn how to use questioning strategies to enhance reading comprehension for all students.

February 26, 2018 to March 1, 2018

  • Designed for teachers in grades 4–8.

    Our public schools are encountering a multicultural diversity challenge. Minority students (and all students) need to see positive verbal and visual images of children like themselves in the books they read. When children see themselves in books they are motivated to read more books and read more often. It can increase self-esteem and make them feel part of the larger society. Reading literature about people from other cultures can increase sensitivity to those who are different from themselves, improve their knowledge of the world, and help them realize that although people have many differences, they also share many similarities. Learn to identify and evaluate books and online literacy resources that you can use to build a positive multicultural classroom. Become familiar with grants and other sources you can use to acquire multicultural resources. We also will explore strategies for involving parents in multicultural literacy programs.

March 5, 2018 to March 8, 2018

  • Computer science drives job growth and innovation throughout our economy and society. According to Code.org: computing occupations make up two-thirds of all projected new jobs in STEM fields, making Computer Science one of the most in-demand college degrees. Most students, however, do not have the opportunity to learn coding. You can help change this by inspiring students to learn more about computer science. Learn how to code, how to integrate coding into your curriculum, and the basics in robotics.

  • Through no fault of its own, nonfiction writing has earned a reputation as something to be suffered through. Consider, however, that the Oscar-nominated films Into the Wild; Girl, Interrupted; and Seabiscuit –to name only three—all began life in the bookstore on the nonfiction shelves. Great informational text can be just as compelling as great fiction. In this program, participants will examine a variety of literary nonfiction, from travel and nature writing to investigative journalism. They will learn how to employ such texts in their classrooms to increase student interest and support or extend their reading and writing skills. This program is recommended for secondary teachers.

March 8, 2018 to March 11, 2018

  • NCCAT’s Holocaust Education Program works to promote Holocaust education in North Carolina public schools. It is important to continue our efforts to promote student understanding of the ways in which our individual and collective actions shape the direction of the present and the world of the future. Join fellow alumni of our Holocaust Education Program as we explore teaching the Holocaust. This program will help teachers focus on the power of individuals’ personal stories as an effective vehicle for teaching about the Holocaust, so they may involve students in appropriate and powerful study of this difficult topic. The Gathering is open to teachers who have participated in NCCAT’s “Teaching the Holocaust” programs or in comparable intensive Holocaust education programs.

March 12, 2018 to March 16, 2018

  • Designed for elementary grades teachers.

    Many elementary literacy assessments group students and provide differentiated activities based on each student’s needs. While this is extremely helpful, how do elementary teachers use data from assessments that don’t provide this information? This program will provide support for you in your analysis of student data to diagnose strengths and weaknesses in your students. Gain understanding of Rates of Improvement (ROI) while you investigate the student needs in your classroom. Discuss literacy goals and objectives that are S.M.A.R.T.

March 13, 2018 to March 16, 2018

  • Designed for teachers of grades 6–12.

    Imagine a classroom where digital learning is already immersed into every aspect of the curriculum. Educators today have so many components to consider when creating a lesson, including: content, assessment, collaboration, and digital technology. Learn how to create a learning space where digital tools are seamlessly integrated. Investigate a variety of digital tools and see example lessons for the English/language arts, history, and science classrooms. Inspire your students to become more engaged by creating an immersive digital learning environment.

  • Enthusiasm for the North Carolina FIRST LEGO League (NCFLL) is sweeping the state. Teams of children in grades 4-8 compete by programming and designing LEGO MINDSTORMS robots to complete missions on a table-top playing field. The teams also engage in research projects about real-life issues such as recycling and hydrodynamics. This program will give you the tools you need to start or maintain a LEGO Robotics team at your school. We have hands-on sessions for team logistics, robot programming, leading research projects, and finding support. Learn how you can become a part of this fun and exciting STEM opportunity!

March 19, 2018 to March 22, 2018

  • Educators have a responsibility to effectively integrate new technologies into the curriculum, preparing students for a literacy future we have yet to imagine. Discover how to create learning experiences that take your students from being consumers to creators of digital content. Help your students evaluate and analyze appropriate resources most beneficial to their success as creators. In this hands-on, make-and-take program, you will use free/inexpensive digital tools to create project examples that can be incorporated into your classroom. You will use multiple apps in conjunction (app-smashing) to create a final product. Seamlessly integrate applications to make standards-based learning fun and interactive. Come with tasks, projects, and ideas for your classroom that involve creation rather than consumption.

  • Reading, as the old saying goes, is fundamental. However, not all public school students have access to the variety of materials necessary to build a strong reading foundation. Research grant opportunities for purchasing books, digital devices, and other materials to aid in literacy instruction. Explore multiple means of acquiring literacy-related donations and discover open-access materials online. Finally, participate in the sharing of strategies for the effective use of these resources.

March 26, 2018 to March 29, 2018

  • Join the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences and NCCAT as we look at ways to enhance students’ environmental literacy through participation in citizen science projects. Get outdoors and explore North Carolina’s coastal ecology as we use the unique and beautiful ecosystems of the Outer Banks as a field laboratory to collect data. Become familiar with some of the many online citizen science databases and learn ways to use the data you and other citizens collect in your classroom. Participate in simple activities that incorporate technology, math, graphing, data analysis, and writing while introducing tools that will help you develop your own lessons and programs using citizen science data.

  • Whether or not your school or district has adopted a Google Chromebook environment, if your LEA infrastructure allows for the use of Google Tools and/or Apps, the “Googlesphere” can be an immense help. It can aid in engaging students, keeping in touch with parents, automating feedback and assessment, sharing documents, and more. Hone your skills with the Google Chrome Browser, with Google Apps, with Android Apps, and with Chrome OS so that you can engage your students using freely available tools on almost any platform.

  • As our students develop as mathematicians, we often wonder if we are best supporting them along that pathway. Learn how to facilitate activities that promote deeper understanding of the mathematical practices that are the foundation of the 21st century classroom. Discover engaging tasks that involve collaboration and problem solving. Explore creative classroom-friendly activities that build mathematical fluency. This program will offer multiple opportunities to collaborate and to understand more clearly the correlation of math standards across grade levels.

April 3, 2018 to April 6, 2018

  • The revised English Language Arts NCSCoS for juniors and seniors focuses on fine-tuning students’ recognition and use of language’s persuasive and aesthetic powers. In this program, we will examine several highly complex texts—dramatic, oratorical, fiction and non-fiction. We will consider not only how to teach these texts but also what the texts teach us about how words can be used to persuade, entertain, soothe, and otherwise manipulate. Teachers also will receive dedicated time and assistance to create or revise units and lesson plans for their texts and students.

  • Designed specifically for non-literacy teachers in the elementary grades.

    Literacy instruction is essential and is not exclusive to the 90-minute literacy block. Teachers of all subject areas share the responsibility of ensuring that students are literate and prepared for college and careers. In this program, those teachers whose expertise is not literacy, will investigate ways to integrate literacy into their content area by supporting the instruction that occurs in the 90-minute literacy block. Additionally, teachers will collaborate, explore, and create integrated literacy activities and lessons that they can take back and employ with their students in their classroom.

April 9, 2018 to April 12, 2018

  • It’s easy to see how engineering applies to robots, but how does it apply to the life sciences? Use an engineering problem-solving strategy, the engineering design cycle, in the studies of ecology, molecular biology, genetics, and other life sciences. From the micro to the macro, tackle these and other questions: How do molecules move into and out of cells? Why is clean water critical to healthy ecosystems? Investigate the natural integration between literacy and science as we analyze informational texts to support innovation, learn strategies to help students uncover facts as they read, and challenge students’ preconceptions. Utilize the cycle with literacy strategies, simulations, and data collection tools to motivate creative thinking. Geared toward the middle grades, the concepts can easily be scaled up or down to fit your classroom needs.

  • “Schoolwork at home and homework at school” is one of the many definitions of a flipped classroom. Explore the history, styles, and benefits of flipping your classroom, including practical, hands-on ways to create, curate, and differentiate video content. With help from experienced teachers and educational technologists, each participant will identify what elements of their curriculum could be flipped and will have the opportunity to create a ready-to-roll video lesson with ideas for assessment and follow-up activities. We’ll look at the possibilities created by flipping, including time for project-based and mastery learning. Come gain the confidence, tools and skills to flip your curriculum and create a more responsive, active, social, and creative classroom.

April 16, 2018 to April 19, 2018

  • The statistics are consistent: young male readers lag behind their female counterparts in literacy skills. In many instances, the reading scores of boys bring down the reading scores for the entire school. Explore the social, psychological, and developmental reasons why boys lag behind girls. Identify reading materials you can use in your classroom to capture and keep the attention of your struggling readers. Experience a variety of instructional methods such as text selection designed for boys, contests and competitions, focus reading groups, and the latest websites and blogs to boost literacy achievement. Discover solutions to capture the attention of reluctant male readers.

  • In order for students to become globally competitive, it is imperative students receive a good foundation in literacy instruction. With new challenges facing teachers each day, this task can be daunting. Examine key aspects of the Read to Achieve legislation to insure alignment in your classroom and school with research-based strategies and best practices. See how to “fit it all in” by integrating literacy across the curriculum. Learn how to effectively maintain a progress monitoring assessment schedule. Use data to develop engaging lessons that foster a love for reading while still teaching foundational skills. Develop a reading and writing environment that is welcoming and inviting to students of all developmental levels.

  • Once the purview solely of the English teacher, reading and writing instruction has moved into every classroom. Changes in the standard course of study require that students read greater amounts of non-fiction and construct viable written arguments using reasons and evidence. Teaching writing is a challenge even to those who were trained to do it; it can be downright terrifying to everyone else. This seminar will help teachers of math, science, and social studies see the possibilities writing offers as a tool, both for instruction and assessment. Participants will have the opportunity to practice writing and giving constructive feedback.

April 23, 2018 to April 26, 2018

  • There is new research and a renewed focus across the nation on the value that the arts have in education. The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) includes the arts as a part of a well-balanced education for every student. But what can this mean for elementary math instruction? While most teachers are aware that children exposed to dance, drama, music and visual arts do a better job at mastering content in the non-art subject areas, many feel ill-equipped at designing arts-integrated math experiences. Investigate strategies for engaging your students in deep and meaningful processes as they creatively explore connections between the arts and the non-arts content. Construct lesson plans and gather ideas and resources for enhancing your math instruction. Come build your toolbox of instructional strategies that support arts integration. This program is presented by A+ Schools of North Carolina.

  • It’s time to start thinking outside the box! Teachers often think projects take too much time to plan or don’t know how to align them with curriculum. PBLs are an effective and enjoyable way to learn that allow students to work as a team, reflect, ask questions, build confidence, work with a purpose, problem solve, and learn time management. Investigate what essential questions, unit questions, and content questions will enable you to develop your own PBL unit. Return to your classroom with a PBL unit you create that will excite and engage your students as they claim ownership of their learning.

April 23, 2018 to April 27, 2018

  • Primary sources, such as photographs, manuscripts, maps, and government documents, are now digitized. Educators can easily access and use them to enhance digital learning for their students. Join us at NCCAT as we partner with university libraries and online programs that provide relevant and engaging teaching resources in user-friendly online forms. We also will discover other online sources and explore means of using them that promote critical thinking and analysis skills and engage middle and high school students in technology, language arts, science, social studies, and other subjects. Together we will locate materials relevant to your own North Carolina hometowns or counties and share ways to improve your students’ digital literacy and make these sources more meaningful to them.

April 30, 2018 to May 3, 2018

  • The fundamental difference between the ELA Standards for Grades 9–10 and Grade 8 is not one of substance but of scope. Whereas eighth graders are asked to evaluate the effect of individual elements in a text, freshmen and sophomores must understand how a series of such elements impact a text in its totality. Words like “thorough” and “cumulative” begin to appear in the 9-10 ELA Standards. In this program, participants will engage in a series of activities that scaffold this skill development. We will demystify the concept of author’s purpose and examine how we can sensitize students to understand how the language and organizational choices communicate purpose. This program incorporates many of the activities from “Middle Grades ELA: Teaching Beyond the EOG,” “Teaching English II: Enrich the Mind and the Scores Will Follow,” and “Teaching English I: Fresh Ideas for Freshmen.”

  • How do we take a standardized curricula and design instruction to align with the diverse learning needs of the students in today’s classrooms? How do we ensure students are engaged and motivated to learn? How can we design and implement lessons that ensure student success? This program will help teachers answer these questions by examining elements of lesson design and planning that focus on the learning processes of the students. Teachers will incorporate these elements with evidence and research-based instructional strategies as they design and create lessons for student learning in their classroom.

  • Designed for teachers in grades 4–8.

    Our public schools are encountering a multicultural diversity challenge. Minority students (and all students) need to see positive verbal and visual images of children like themselves in the books they read. When children see themselves in books they are motivated to read more books and read more often. It can increase self-esteem and make them feel part of the larger society. Reading literature about people from other cultures can increase sensitivity to those who are different from themselves, improve their knowledge of the world, and help them realize that although people have many differences, they also share many similarities. Learn to identify and evaluate books and online literacy resources that you can use to build a positive multicultural classroom. Become familiar with grants and other sources you can use to acquire multicultural resources. We also will explore strategies for involving parents in multicultural literacy programs.

May 7, 2018 to May 10, 2018

  • With students learning in 1:1 environments, there is a push for integrating more technology into the classroom. However, technology is changing constantly. So how does one keep up? How does one teach their students to become responsible digital citizens? Come learn why it is important to address the responsible use of technology with your students as they learn to connect, collaborate, and communicate effectively, and safely. Explore resources, articles, and lessons that promote digital citizenship in the classroom. Learn how to weave digital citizenship into your curriculum and create lessons that allow students to become more social media savvy.

  • The Maker Movement empowers regular people to become inventors, engineers, and designers. A current trend in education uses the Maker mindset to encourage students of all ages to build, design, program, solve problems, collaborate, and innovate. Learn to plan lessons that teach the Maker mindset and pull in content as diverse as engineering, reading, and math. In this hands-on session you’ll explore how you might use Maker activities in your classroom to promote learning, to foster engagement, and to build innovation and creativity in your students. Topics include: design, 3D printing, building, invention, robotics, programming, electronics, app smashing, and more!

May 7, 2018 to May 11, 2018

  • Extreme weather events offer multiple opportunities to create engaging lessons across grade levels and the curriculum. Real-time media coverage of devastating storms like Maria and Irma creates the ideal catalyst for motivating student interest in science, literacy, technology, and social studies lessons. Hear accounts from Outer Banks residents who have experienced hurricanes firsthand and see evidence of damage caused by recent storms. Partner with science, literacy, and digital learning experts to explore how extreme weather events are the perfect curriculum storm for creating lessons that will enhance K–12 instruction.

May 14, 2018 to May 17, 2018

  • Writing instruction is not only important but also vital for today’s students. Yet finding the time to teach writing in the elementary classroom can prove challenging. In this program, teachers will explore the various purposes for writing, the writing process, and strategies to integrate writing in other content areas. Additionally, teachers will investigate creative strategies to motivate students to write.

  • Designed for teachers in grades 4–12.

    Students are engaged when they are involved in their work, persist despite challenges and obstacles, and take visible delight in their accomplishments. Solving student engagement issues is complex. What works in one class may be a failure in the next, with every year presenting new challenges for engaging students in various lessons. This program will use a collaborative classroom process to address questions dealing with how to create a classroom culture and how to create classroom instructions that facilitates self-motivation, personal responsibility, and perseverance of students. Participants also will review and evaluate motivational strategies for engaging students that can be used upon their return to the classroom.

  • How many of us have endured the drudgery of the “sit ‘n’ git” workshop and sworn silently that we would never inflict the same fate on our students? This promise represents not only good humor, but also good pedagogy. A wealth of research supports the hypothesis that physical activity can boost comprehension, retention, and self-regulation in students of all achievement levels. Teachers who build movement into their lesson designs will have students who are less disruptive and more engaged. Teachers will learn a variety of strategies for integrating instruction with physical activity, but not at the expense of intellectual rigor. Armed with a collection of techniques you can use immediately, design and create your own physically and mentally active lessons. All teachers from pre-K through 12th-grade are encouraged to attend.

May 21, 2018 to May 24, 2018

  • Designed for teacher leaders and instructional coaches.

    Professional learning that recognizes teachers as agents of their own growth and allows them to direct their own learning, leads to increased educator effectiveness. The Standards for Professional Learning can be used to guide the development, implementation, and evaluation of professional learning. Through a series of collaborative activities, participants will analyze the purpose and key components of Learning Communities, Leadership, Resources, Data, Learning Designs, Implementation and Outcomes. We will explore the relationship between teacher agency and professional growth with a goal of developing your capacity to engage in and lead effective professional learning experiences aligned to the Standards for Professional Learning. Participants will create an action plan with steps for implementing the Standards in their school or district and discuss their alignment with evaluation standards.

  • This program is designed specifically for high school Trade and Industry teachers.

    It can be a struggle for career and technical education teachers to find appropriate resources to engage their students when designing their courses to fit the 16 Career Clusters and 79 related pathways that are a part of the CTE essential standards. Join CTE experts as we investigate digital resources, community partnerships, and strategies that provide enhanced instruction across the multiple curriculums in this field. Create lessons that enrich and extend these standards. Explore the policies and best practices of CTE education and how they can help launch students for success in a broad range of occupations and career specialties.

June 12, 2018 to June 15, 2018

  • Today’s diverse students enter school eager to become successful in classrooms originally designed for culturally homogeneous populations and are expected to learn from teachers who are often not from the same cultural, ethnic/race or social-class. Unsurprisingly, student performance in reading and other subjects is often low while student dropout and teacher burnout rates are high. This program guides participants to explore and document their experiences in motivating at-risk students to become effective readers. In addition to sharing successful strategies for improving reading skills and producing a written narrative, participants will examine barriers children encounter along the pathway and how these barriers affected them. Additionally participants will become familiar with strategies they can use today to change the culture of the classroom to support the development of higher order thinking skills while enhancing self-motivation, personal responsibility, and perseverance to become skilled readers who excel academically.

  • This hands-on, minds-on seminar is designed to help teachers explore, evaluate, and apply blended models, structures, strategies, and tools to increase personalization in their classrooms. Throughout the week, participants will design a blended learning blueprint for their classrooms to assist with planning and implementing a personalized learning environment. Join us to learn how to leverage technology to meet each student’s needs in a blended classroom.

  • Elementary teachers may find that “fitting it all in” is impossible. Using informational text and technologies, elementary teachers will discover that not only is it possible to “fit it all in” it is fun! Examine the North Carolina Essential Standards and make connections to the North Carolina Standard Course of Study, ELA and Writing Standards. Investigate text sets and the role they play in integrating multiple contents. Create engaging cross-curricular instructional units with culminating projects for assessments.

June 18, 2018 to June 22, 2018

  • Whether or not your school or district has adopted a Google Chromebook environment, if your LEA infrastructure allows for the use of Google Tools and/or Apps, the “Googlesphere” can be an immense help. It can aid in engaging students, keeping in touch with parents, automating feedback and assessment, sharing documents, and more. Hone your skills with the Google Chrome Browser, with Google Apps, with Android Apps, and with Chrome OS so that you can engage your students using freely available tools on almost any platform.

June 25, 2018 to June 28, 2018

  • Designed for teachers in grades 412.

    Teaching reading skills in English/Language Arts classes and across the disciplines is an almost guaranteed way to help students retain content. Unfortunately, the tendency to focus on the content is a real enemy to the ultimate goal of building reading skills. Without a repertoire of reading strategies that can be applied to any text, reluctant, struggling and disengaged students are not assured enough opportunities to read throughout the school day. In order to teach students to read effectively, teachers must be sure that they are not simply suppliers of information about a particular text but also instructors of techniques to build reading skills using materials that are relevant to their students. Participants in this program will review ideas about how to incorporate reading skill lessons into their curriculum so that they are enticing to struggling, reluctant, and disengaged learners.

  • North Carolina’s coastal ecosystems can provide rich lessons to enhance the high school biology curriculum, including how living organisms within these environments demonstrate interdependence, adaptations, and stability. Close focus of these ecosystems will reveal the complex workings of carbon and nitrogen cycles, energy pyramids, and biochemical processes and energy use in the cell. Understand how humans impact these coastal ecosystems through population growth, technology, consumption of resources, and production of waste. Partner with biologists and other science experts to create lessons that will engage high school students and advance their learning of North Carolina biology standards

June 25, 2018 to June 29, 2018

  • Exceptional Children (EC) teachers have all of the traditional needs of beginning teachers, plus a lot more--and often those additional needs incur the greatest need for support. Open to teachers in their first, second, or third year of EC teaching, this program supports motivated beginning EC teachers by strengthening their knowledge base and classroom expertise. Through experiential learning, teachers will explore differentiated instruction, brain-compatible teaching, co-teaching, student advocacy, small group facilitation, and more. Come prepared to build professional competence and confidence, improve student achievement, and reinforce your commitment to this critically important profession.

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